Our Sample Texts

In order to avoid plagiarism one first needs to know how to recognize it. So first we’ll look at original sources from a Political Science text, a photograph from the National Archives of Canada, and a graph from Statistics Canada and then some samples, using these sources, of how plagiarism might occur in student writing and how to steer clear of plagiarizing. 

Our Sample Text

Hartz has argued correctly that it is characteristic of fragment societies to be intolerant of rival ideologies. Our argument is that Canada is not a fragment society, but exhibits the ideological diversity of European societies, although it has a more liberal cast. This toleration, born of the necessity to live with and listen to the other voices in the ideological conversation, has deeply affected Canadian political life. Thus, we have noted a willingness in all of the major Canadian ideologies to be open, sometimes too open, to developments elsewhere. Canadian Liberalism had, by the 1919 convention, accepted the modifications of liberalism suggested in Britain by Green and Hobhouse, and had begun to develop a form of welfare liberalism in this country. The Conservative Party willingly accepted the lead of Disraeli and the British Tory Party in the nineteenth century. More recently, it has turned its attention to the United States,… (Christian and Campbell, 1990, p.283)

Our Sample Photograph

Troop Front
"Troop Front" Canadian Mounted Rifles with Second Contingent South Africa
(Source: Canada. Library and Archives Canada.photo # PA-028895)

Our Sample Graph

[Crime Rates by Province and Territory, 2003 graph]

Crime rates by province and territory in 2003

(Source: Canada. Statistics Canada, 2004)

Credits

 
Here are the original sources for the examples that follow: The text is taken from Christian, William, and Colin Campbell. Political Parties and Ideologies in Canada. Third Edition, Toronto: McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 1990. 283. (Material copyright of William Christian and Colin Campbell and used with their permission.)
 
The photograph is from Canada. The National Archives of Canada. Patent and Copyright Office Collection, ArchiviaNet: On-line Research Tool. "'Troop Front.' Canadian Mounted Rifles with Second Contingent South Africa. By Steele and Co. 1900. Accession No. 1966-094. July 28, 2004: 1. <http://data4.collectionscanada.ca/netacgi/nph-brs?s1=troop+front&1=20&Se... … > July 28, 2004. (Copyright: Expired)
 
The graph is from Canada. Statistics Canada. "Crime Statistics, 2003." The Daily. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. catalogue no. 11-001-XIE. Wednesday, July 28, 2004: 2. <http://www/statcan.ca/Daily/English/040728/d040728a.htm.> (Permission granted.)
 
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